Midterm I

Administrative notes

  • Friday 10/4 5pm through Sunday 10/6 11:55pm. You must submit your midterm no later than Sunday at 11:55pm.
  • Instructions on taking exams for Smithies and Five College Students. Print the exam in color.

  • Notes for before exam:
    • Link to print exam in the Seelye basement lab is posted on Moodle.
    • Bring colored pencils/pens.
    • You do not need a calculator.
    • Print exam in color.
  • Notes for during exam:
    • Closed-book, no internet, and individually completed.
    • You will be given 140 mins to complete it (including transit time to writing area), however I try to time it so that it will take much less than that. In other words, you should have plenty of time to complete it without rushing.
    • Timestamps will be strictly enforced. Any timestamps indicating than more than 140 minutes are subject to a 50% penalty and an honor board case.
    • In case of potential errors or ambiguity on the exam, please note them, state your assumptions, and use your best judgement.
  • Notes for after exam:
    • Be sure to timestamp your exam before returning.
    • Insert exam in appropriately labeled box in hallway.

Topics

  • Topics: Lectures 1-10 inclusive (up to and including color theory in-class exercises).
  • What to study:
    • Practice midterm posted on Slack. We’ll go over them in Wednesday’s lecture.
    • Lecture notes: both “chalk talk” and what’s on webpage.
    • Problem sets and solutions.
    • ModernDive readings and learning checks.

Results

Boxplot of scores (out of 34) with no whiskers below. Quartiles were 30.12 / 32 / 33.

Midterm II

Administrative notes

  • Friday 11/8 5pm through Sunday 11/10 11:55pm. You must submit your midterm no later than Sunday at 11:55pm.
  • Instructions on taking exams for Smithies and Five College Students. Print the exam in color.

  • Notes for before exam:
    • Link to print exam in the Seelye basement lab is posted on Moodle.
    • Bring colored pencils/pens.
    • You do not need a calculator.
    • Print exam in color.
  • Notes for during exam:
    • Closed-book, no internet, and individually completed.
    • You will be given 140 mins to complete it (including transit time to writing area), however I try to time it so that it will take much less than that. In other words, you should have plenty of time to complete it without rushing.
    • Timestamps will be strictly enforced. Any timestamps indicating than more than 140 minutes are subject to an honor board case and depending on decision a 50% penalty.
    • In case of potential errors or ambiguity on the exam, please note them, state your assumptions, and use your best judgement.
  • Notes for after exam:
    • Be sure to timestamp your exam before returning.
    • Insert exam in appropriately labeled box in hallway.

Topics

  • Topics:
    • Lecture 10-12. Last few topics on Data viz: Color theory, trend lines. Added on 11/6: No Shiny apps.
    • Lecture 14-20. Data wrangling, “tidy” data, and importing data.
  • Themes:
    • The midterm is not “cummulative” in the sense that the focus will be on Lectures 10-20, but you still need to know/understand topics from Midterm I because the materials build on top of each other.
    • Know how to write pseudocode like in the Available Seat Miles exercise in Lecture 19 on Wed 10/23. Click here for examples. Pseudocode is both:
      • Just general enough to apply to any programming language/statistical software: R, python, SPSS, STATA, SAS, etc.
      • Just specific enough that the instructions are unambigious
    • Know the difference between these five joins: left_join(), right_join(), inner_join(), full_join(), and anti_join(). Go over the code examples on the course webpage for Lec19.
  • What to study. Here is my suggested order:
    • Practice midterm posted on Slack under #general_announcement: this will give you a feel for the types of questions to expect.
    • Read chalk talk notes: they emphasize/summarize the most important ideas.
    • ModernDive Learning Check 3.20 on available seat miles (solutions in Appendix D): this is an all-encompassing problem that draws on nearly all the data wrangling verbs we’ve seen.
    • ModernDive readings and learning checks: In particular the more theoretical ideas of “tidy” data.
    • Problem sets 04 and 05

Practice midterm notes

Question 1

## # A tibble: 1,924,665 x 5
##     year sex   name          n   prop
##    <dbl> <chr> <chr>     <int>  <dbl>
##  1  1880 F     Mary       7065 0.0724
##  2  1880 F     Anna       2604 0.0267
##  3  1880 F     Emma       2003 0.0205
##  4  1880 F     Elizabeth  1939 0.0199
##  5  1880 F     Minnie     1746 0.0179
##  6  1880 F     Margaret   1578 0.0162
##  7  1880 F     Ida        1472 0.0151
##  8  1880 F     Alice      1414 0.0145
##  9  1880 F     Bertha     1320 0.0135
## 10  1880 F     Sarah      1288 0.0132
## # … with 1,924,655 more rows

Question 2

## [1] 26115

Question 4

Based on Dear Mona Followup: Where Do People Drink The Most Beer, Wine And Spirits?.

## # A tibble: 193 x 5
##    country      beer_servings spirit_servings wine_servings total_litres_of_pur…
##    <chr>                <int>           <int>         <int>                <dbl>
##  1 Afghanistan              0               0             0                  0  
##  2 Albania                 89             132            54                  4.9
##  3 Algeria                 25               0            14                  0.7
##  4 Andorra                245             138           312                 12.4
##  5 Angola                 217              57            45                  5.9
##  6 Antigua & B…           102             128            45                  4.9
##  7 Argentina              193              25           221                  8.3
##  8 Armenia                 21             179            11                  3.8
##  9 Australia              261              72           212                 10.4
## 10 Austria                279              75           191                  9.7
## # … with 183 more rows
## # A tibble: 579 x 4
##    country     total_litres_of_pure_alcohol type   servings
##    <chr>                              <dbl> <chr>     <int>
##  1 Afghanistan                          0   beer          0
##  2 Afghanistan                          0   spirit        0
##  3 Afghanistan                          0   wine          0
##  4 Albania                              4.9 beer         89
##  5 Albania                              4.9 spirit      132
##  6 Albania                              4.9 wine         54
##  7 Algeria                              0.7 beer         25
##  8 Algeria                              0.7 spirit        0
##  9 Algeria                              0.7 wine         14
## 10 Andorra                             12.4 beer        245
## # … with 569 more rows

Question 6

You are presented with data on the Titanic disaster of 1912 in a data frame Titanic, which cross-classifies survival vs death by class, sex, and age. Write down the pseudocode of the commands that will output a table comparing survival vs death counts for the following three scenarios:

  • by sex
  • by sex and class and age
  • to answer the question if the “women and children”-first policy of the White Star Line Company (the company that ran the Titanic) held true or not.

Note: you don’t need to calculate the output table, just write the pseudocode that would produce it where the more concise the pseudocode the better. Here is what the Titanic data looks like:\

## # A tibble: 32 x 5
##    Class Sex    Age   Survived     n
##    <chr> <chr>  <chr> <chr>    <dbl>
##  1 1st   Male   Child No           0
##  2 2nd   Male   Child No           0
##  3 3rd   Male   Child No          35
##  4 Crew  Male   Child No           0
##  5 1st   Female Child No           0
##  6 2nd   Female Child No           0
##  7 3rd   Female Child No          17
##  8 Crew  Female Child No           0
##  9 1st   Male   Adult No         118
## 10 2nd   Male   Adult No         154
## # … with 22 more rows

Solutions

The key thing to note here is that the different combinations of Class, Sex, Age, and Survived are pre-counted in the n variable. Thus the Titanic data frame has only 32 rows. This is different than the titanic data frame from PS05 Question 2 that has 2201 rows: one for each passenger.

So the data wrangling is a little different! Here we must sum(n) whereas in PS05 we used the n() summary function to count rows.

Part a): by sex

## # A tibble: 4 x 3
## # Groups:   Sex [2]
##   Sex    Survived     n
##   <chr>  <chr>    <dbl>
## 1 Female No         126
## 2 Female Yes        344
## 3 Male   No        1364
## 4 Male   Yes        367

Part b): by sex, age, and class

Nothing to do! We already have Survived ("No" vs "Yes") counts split by these categories!

Part c): In retrospect this question is much harder than you can expect on the midterm. However if you’re curious:

First we need to have Survived ("No" vs "Yes") counts for each Sex and Age combinations:

## # A tibble: 8 x 4
## # Groups:   Sex, Age [4]
##   Sex    Age   Survived     n
##   <chr>  <chr> <chr>    <dbl>
## 1 Female Adult No         109
## 2 Female Adult Yes        316
## 3 Female Child No          17
## 4 Female Child Yes         28
## 5 Male   Adult No        1329
## 6 Male   Adult Yes        338
## 7 Male   Child No          35
## 8 Male   Child Yes         29

Next we need to identify the “women and children”

## # A tibble: 8 x 5
## # Groups:   Sex, Age [4]
##   Sex    Age   Survived     n w_or_c
##   <chr>  <chr> <chr>    <dbl> <lgl> 
## 1 Female Adult No         109 TRUE  
## 2 Female Adult Yes        316 TRUE  
## 3 Female Child No          17 TRUE  
## 4 Female Child Yes         28 TRUE  
## 5 Male   Adult No        1329 FALSE 
## 6 Male   Adult Yes        338 FALSE 
## 7 Male   Child No          35 TRUE  
## 8 Male   Child Yes         29 TRUE

Next group_by() this new variable and get the sum of n

## # A tibble: 4 x 3
## # Groups:   w_or_c [2]
##   w_or_c Survived     n
##   <lgl>  <chr>    <dbl>
## 1 FALSE  No        1329
## 2 FALSE  Yes        338
## 3 TRUE   No         161
## 4 TRUE   Yes        373

Next compute the proportions. We haven’t done this much in class, but if you look in tips and tricks, you’ll see this is one of the rare cases we use group_by(), but not followed by a summarize() but a mutate() instead:

## # A tibble: 4 x 5
## # Groups:   w_or_c [2]
##   w_or_c Survived     n total  prop
##   <lgl>  <chr>    <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
## 1 FALSE  No        1329  1667 0.797
## 2 FALSE  Yes        338  1667 0.203
## 3 TRUE   No         161   534 0.301
## 4 TRUE   Yes        373   534 0.699

Lastly, to make things easier to look at, let’s only look at Survived equals "Yes"

## # A tibble: 2 x 5
## # Groups:   w_or_c [2]
##   w_or_c Survived     n total  prop
##   <lgl>  <chr>    <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
## 1 FALSE  Yes        338  1667 0.203
## 2 TRUE   Yes        373   534 0.699

So yes, it seems “women and children first” did hold as seen by the 69.9% vs 20.3%.

Results

Boxplot of scores with no whiskers below.

Source for Questions